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Humanities Program  

HUM 124 Lecture Schedule

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These lectures are free and open to the public. Please check the seating chart for available open seating.

Spring 2014

Lipinsky Auditorium (LIP 125) 11:25a.m.-12:35p.m.

January 13, 2014

Intro to HUM/ Mesopotamia
Dr. Moseley, Professor & Chair, Department of Literature and Language 

This opening lecture will include an introduction to the Humanities program, observations about the rise of civilizations, and some overview of the Mesopotamian culture.

Lecture Outline


January 20, 2014

Martin Luther King Jr. Day - No Lecture


January 27, 2014

Egypt
Dr. Hook, Associate Professor, Department of Classics and Humanities Program Director

This lecture will address Egypt's history and culture, with special attention to some Egyptian beliefs represented in its art, and some Egyptian thought represented in its writing.

Lecture Outline


February 3, 2014

Ancient Israel
Prof. Lundblad, Lecturer, Humanities Program

This lecture discusses the ancient Israelites and their neighbors in Canaan, also known as "the Levant," an area that is considered holy by several religious traditions.

Lecture Outline


February 10, 2014

China
Dr. Li, Lecturer in Chinese Studies, International Studies Program

This lecture is an introduction to the three major philosophies of ancient China--Confucianism, Daoism, and Legalism.

Lecture Outline


February 17, 2014

India and Hinduism
Dr. Zubko, Assistant Professor, Department of Religious Studies

Ancient India holds many clues to understanding contemporary Hinduism. This lecture will explore some of the more prominent ideas, including purity, fire sacrifice, cosmology and the divine nature of humans, and dharma, or duty.

Lecture Outline


February 24, 2014

Buddhism and Jainism
Dr. Zubko, Assistant Professor, Department of Religious Studies

Two world religious movements beginning in 6th c. BCE offer new perspectives in ancient India as to how to respond to the suffering of human beings. 

Lecture Outline


March 3, 2014

Heroic and Archaic Greece
Dr. Mills, Professor, Department of Classics and N.E.H. Distinguished Teaching Professor in the Humanities

Before there was Harry Potter, there was Homer’s Odyssey, a tale of magic and monsters and one man’s quest. But who was Homer? And how did a poet who could neither read nor write create the first novel in Western history?

Lecture Outline


March 10, 2014 

Spring Break -  No Lecture


March 17, 2014

Myth, Ritual, Performance
Dr. Hopes, Professor, Department of Literature & Language

Mythos and Logos: Ancient Modes of Understanding: or, Why Everything Is a Myth

Lecture Outline


March 24, 2014

Greek City-States and Theatre
Dr. Mills, Professor, Department of Classics and N.E.H. Distinguished Teaching Professor in the Humanities

Athens: "school of Greece", "cradle of democracy", home of the Parthenon and Pericles, "tyrant city", exploitative and occasionally vicious imperialist, hated and feared by the rest of Greece. Come and learn about some of the contradictions in one of western civilisation's most remarkable cities.

Lecture Outline


March 31, 2014

Ancient Comparative Philosophy
Dr. Hook, Associate Professor, Department of Classics and Humanities Program Director

This lecture will present an overview of Greek and Buddhist views of what is 'real' and how we should live in response to that reality, with special attention paid to Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, the Buddha, and Nagarjuna.

Lecture Outline


April 7, 2014

Persia and the Hellenistic World
Dr. Butera, Assistant Professor,  Department of Classics

When Alexander the Great conquered Persia--one of the first universal empires--he thereby changed the world forever.

Lecture Outline


April 14, 2014

Rome
Dr. Hook, Associate Professor, Department of Classics and Humanities Program Director

This lecture examines the final century of the Roman Republic and the first century of the Roman Empire, and the forces that led to the transition.

Lecture Outline


The Week in HUM 124April 21, 2014


Second Temple Judaism and Early Christianity

Dr. Moseley, Professor & Chair, Department of Literature and Language

 

An account of how Second Temple Judaism, alongside social conditions and philosophies of the Hellenistic period, gave rise to the Jesus Movement, and how it became institutionalized as Christianity.

Lecture Outline


April 28, 2014 - Last Day of Classes

Silk Road
Prof. LaFerla, Lecturer, Humanities Program & Faculty Panel

An interdisciplinary panel lecture focusing on intercultural connections along the Ancient Silk Road, 200 BCE - 400 CE.

Last edited by kcornell@unca.edu on April 17, 2014